Whose Corruption? Which Law? Law’s Authority and Social Power

accountability
in F Anechiarico (ed) (2017) Legal But Corrupt: a New Perspective on Public Ethics, London: Rowman & Littlefield
Author

Ciarán O’Kelly

Published

January 8, 2017

A link to the book is here

This paper focuses on ‘legal but corrupt’ from a pluralist perspective. The plurality of state and non-state laws under which we are governed sets limits on any institutional capacity to name misconduct and from there to discover it. I take ‘legal but corrupt’ to denote conduct that is validated, legitimated and justified through an appeal to some institutional rule-set, despite that conduct not measuring up to other expectations for behaviour to which the individuals might be held.

Citation

BibTeX citation:
@incollection{o'kelly2017,
  author = {Ciarán O’Kelly},
  editor = {F Anechiarico},
  publisher = {Rowman \& Littlefield},
  title = {Whose {Corruption?} {Which} {Law?} {Law’s} {Authority} and
    {Social} {Power}},
  booktitle = {Legal But Corrupt: a New Perspective on Public Ethics},
  date = {2017-01-08},
  address = {London},
  url = {https://rowman.com/isbn/9781498536394},
  langid = {en}
}
For attribution, please cite this work as:
Ciarán O’Kelly. 2017. “Whose Corruption? Which Law? Law’s Authority and Social Power.” In Legal But Corrupt: A New Perspective on Public Ethics, edited by F Anechiarico. London: Rowman & Littlefield. https://rowman.com/isbn/9781498536394.