Whose Corruption? Which Law? Law's Authority and Social Power

Abstract

This paper focuses on ‘legal but corrupt’ from a pluralist perspective. The plurality of state and non-state laws under which we are governed sets limits on any institutional capacity to name misconduct and from there to discover it. I take ‘legal but corrupt’ to denote conduct that is validated, legitimated and justified through an appeal to some institutional rule-set, despite that conduct not measuring up to other expectations for behavior to which the individuals might be held.

Publication
in F Anechiarico (ed) (2017) Legal But Corrupt: a New Perspective on Public Ethics, London: Rowman & Littlefield.